Category: Local News

North Buffalo Purchases Replacement Maintenance Equipment

 

by Jonathan Weaver

If snow returns to North Buffalo Township, township maintenance crews will have at least two new pieces of equipment to keep residents and motorists safe.

At last night’s monthly supervisors meeting, Roadmaster Clark Whiteman announced two trucks had been purchased earlier this month: including a 1995 International 4500 plow truck.

In addition to upgrades being made at the township office, North Buffalo Township Roadmaster Clark Whiteman talked about some replacements to the road equipment at last night's township meeting

In addition to upgrades being made at the township office, North Buffalo Township Roadmaster Clark Whiteman talked about some replacements to the road equipment at last night’s township meeting

After inspection by the Township Supervisors David Wolfe, Paul Kirkwood and Whiteman – as well as a township employee – and negotiation, the plow truck was purchased for $6,500. It replaces a 1994 tandem plow truck with hydraulic problems.

“The `94, we can’t find a pump for anywhere in the United States. We can’t find parts for it – that’s why we’re replacing it,” Whiteman said. “It’s obsolete – so at what point do you stop throwing money at stuff you can’t find parts for?”

Whiteman estimated the pump broke about five weeks ago – only leaving the township with five plow trucks.

“We have 33 miles of road to take care of,” Whiteman said. “We (even) have a plow for on our grader if we need to.”

Supervisors also purchased a 2004 GMC 4200 bucket truck for $9,800 to upgrade its current 1998 model.

The bucket truck has still be in-use, “to some degree,” Whiteman said.

Whiteman called both purchased “cost-effective.”

Last month, Whiteman emphasized the need to upgrade equipment as well.

“The sooner the better,” Whiteman said.

After the used equipment is possibly sold, supervisors are considering purchasing a storage shed to serve as both a police impound lot and to store equipment and material – such as rock, salt and anti-skid.

If a suitable option is found, supervisors also are considering the purchase of a new grader to replace a grader that is nearly 50 years old.

“We’re looking at equipment, but it just depends. If something comes along that’s decent, we’ll consider it,” Whiteman concluded.

In the mean time, supervisors will take advantage of the favorable weather to survey all township roads next week to consider summer road projects.

Through the purchases and balloon payments, supervisors are trying to reduce debt while at the same time saving money to potentially buy equipment again next year.

McCausland Announces Election Bid

 

by Jonathan Weaver

A Cowanshannock Township man is campaigning to be the next district judge in Rural Valley.

Kevin McCausland will seek both Democratic and Republican nominations this May to fill the Magisterial District Judge vacancy in District 4.

McCausland, who moved to Cowanshannock Township after him and his wife – Patti –, graduated from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, worked in criminal justice for 25 years until his retirement in June 2015. He worked as a probation officer for Indiana County, at SCI-Pine Grove with the Department of Corrections before finishing his career thus far as a parole agent with the Pennsylvania Board of Probation and Parole.

Kevin McCausland, of Cowanshannock Township, announced he will seek voter support this May to be Magisterial District Judge in Rural Valley (submitted photo).

Kevin McCausland, of Cowanshannock Township, announced he will seek voter support this May to be Magisterial District Judge in Rural Valley (submitted photo).

McCausland recalled many criminal investigations that led him to the district court office.

“I’ve sat through many preliminary hearings and I know the judicial system very well,” McCausland said. “(Being a district judge) was something I always thought about. When I worked for the state as a parole agent, I was not able to do anything politically, but when I retired in June `15, that made me eligible to run for the political position. It’s a learning experience.”

As a parole agent, McCausland said the regional drug epidemic made an impact and has indeed become “a problem that needs to be worked with” with police and other cooperating agencies.

“And the rural areas seemed to get hit first. Now, it’s just been a growing problem and has taken over,” McCausland said. “It doesn’t discriminate amongst anyone – it’s nearly affected every family in this county at some point.

“I got to know the signs and symptoms of it. I got to know how to work with (offenders) and try to get them on the road to recovery – which is very difficult.”

McCausland, who maintains an effective rapport with service and law enforcement agencies, became certified to perform the duties of a Magisterial District Judge in September after he passed a “very intense” 20-day course in Harrisburg this past June. He was also re-certified in December.

He pledged to treat all who enter his courtroom with dignity and respect.

“I am eager to serve the public at a Magisterial District Judge in Region 4 of Armstrong County,” McCausland concluded.

The couple lives on their family’s 65-acre farmland with daughters, Bethani and Kaitlin. Bethani also studies criminology at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.