Category: Manor Township

Grant Dollars Going toward Manor Township Road Improvements

Earlier this month, Manor Township supervisors approved applying to use Community Development Block Grant funding toward reconstructing Boyd Road.

Earlier this month, Manor Township supervisors approved applying to use Community Development Block Grant funding toward reconstructing Boyd Road.

by Jonathan Weaver

Manor Township supervisors have approved an application to go forward with street reconstruction and water line additions to a local road.

During the past few months, Supervisors Paul Rearick, Bob Southworth and Don Palmer have discussed Boyd Road with Armstrong County Planning and Development Community Development Coordinator Kathy Heilman.

With their allotment of approximately $84,800 in 2016 Community Development Block Grant funds, supervisors unanimously agreed to apply to use that funding toward a multi-year street reconstruction project.

Township supervisors will be able to use about $69,500 in funds, but about $15,300 will go toward County Planning and Development administration costs.

Last month, supervisors agreed to modify 2013 Community Development Block Grant funds to ensure both projects are completed.

Armstrong County Planning and Development Community Development Coordinator Kathy Heilman explained supervisors agreed to modify 2013 Community Development Block Grant funds to ensure both Boyd Road projects could be completed.

Armstrong County Planning and Development Community Development Coordinator Kathy Heilman explained supervisors agreed to modify 2013 Community Development Block Grant funds to ensure both Boyd Road projects could be completed.

Heilman explained more than $20,000 originally designated for then-Short Street storm sewer reconstruction project and township-wide rehabilitation funds was made available for both the Boyd Road waterline extension project and street reconstruction.

“We had some funds left and we are going to need them (for) the Boyd Road waterline and reconstruction,” Heilman said.

County commissioners also approved the modification unanimously.

In June, supervisors agreed at a public hearing for Senate Engineering – the township’s go-to engineering firm – to oversee the project.

Senate’s Ben Bothell stated two bids for the work was received – the lower of the two from Tim Fouse Excavating in Kittanning. Bothell recommended Fouse be awarded the bid due to previous experience with the contractor.

According to the advertised request that began during the second week of February, the proposed scope of work includes the installation of approximately 300 feet of water line pipe; 30 feet of 3/4” service line, three service connections including corporation cocks, three curb boxes and three curb stops , and the connection to existing water line, among other specifics.

A trio of households will be provided a potable water source eliminating the need for a private well to provide water for their consumption.

Previous experience on similar projects and technical qualifications and ability to complete the project during the next year were all considered with the application.

In 2012 and 2013, money was earmarked for resurfacing and drainage improvements along Short Street (which is only a block over from School Street).

Shadco, LLC of Marion Center was the contractor responsible for improving road conditions for about five households.

About $48,750 was designated to extend water service to three residences along Boyd Road (based on the road’s condition and engineering) and the remaining funds were allocated toward housing rehabilitation.

Township officials are still in the survey process to determine how to utilize 2016 CDBG dollars. Hileman is currently working on collecting income surveys to possibly reconstruct Iseman Hill Road.

Cooperation agreements for both 2015 and 2016 were also approved unanimously last month.

The application is due by November 18.

Next weekend will be the municipality’s Fall Cleanup.

Fall Cleanup will be Thursday, Sept. 29 through Saturday, Oct. 1. Items can be disposed of from 7AM-7PM Thursday, 7AM-3PM Friday and 8AM-4PM Saturday in dumpsters located at the Manor Township municipal shed – 189 Fort Run Rd., Ford City.

Supervisor Chair Paul Rearick said there are restrictions on what can be accepted.

According to the Township social media page, the township will not accept: refrigerators, freezers, air conditioners, dehumidifiers, any items with Freon, liquids – such as paint, oil or anti-freeze -, tires, building materials, wood products, fluorescent lights, concrete or any concrete items, electronics – such as televisions, VCRS, video games, computer monitors, computer towers and radios – or general household garbage.

“A lot of communities are only doing one in the Spring now – we decided last year to do two, and it worked out. It gives our residents an opportunity if they see something they have to get rid of. If there are any elderly residents or people with disabilities that need help getting their trash, junk to us, give a call to the office and we’ll make arrangements to come and pick it up,” Rearick said.

Township Supervisor and Road Foreman Bob Southworth said the township will recycle metal disposed of next weekend.

Residents can request more information by calling the Township municipal building at 724-763-9215.

Life-Saving Equipment Purchased for Manor Township Firefighters

Manor Township Supervisors Bob Southworth and Don Palmer (on left and right ends) look at new fire rescue tools with (left to right) First Lieutenant John Breski, Fire Chief Chad Evans, Assistant Fire Chief Matt Klingensmith and Second Lieutenant Luke Linnon.

Manor Township Supervisors Bob Southworth and Don Palmer (on left and right ends) look at new fire rescue tools with (left to right) First Lieutenant John Breski, Fire Chief Chad Evans, Assistant Fire Chief Matt Klingensmith and Second Lieutenant Luke Linnon.

by Jonathan Weaver

Before continuing their hazardous materials instruction Thursday, Manor Township volunteer firefighters showed off some of their new lifesaving tools outside their fire department.

The $30,000 spreader, cutter and ram tools will be used to bend and cut metal of vehicles to rescue entrapped motorists and passengers during vehicle accidents or structure fires.

Fire Chief Chad Evans said firefighters waited about six weeks from the time tools were ordered until delivery.

“This is the first time Manor has had rescue tools,” Chief Evans said. “It’ll benefit us drastically.”

Currently, volunteer firefighters are aided by Kittanning Township volunteer firefighters for rescue, and have been for more than 24 years – a department that is increasingly sought after.

“That kind-of puts us in a bind if something would happen in Manor Township. Our nearest rescue would either be Ford City or across the river – depending where it’s at,” Chief Evans said. “Manor Township is 18.2 square miles. We have two major highways – State Route 422 (and) State Route 66.”

Assistant Fire Chief Matt Klingensmith said the tools will help rescuers get patients in a trauma center within an hour.

“There are a lot of times we need two rescue trucks or two pieces of a specific tool. We can use ours while they use theirs,” Klingensmith said. “It’s a good asset to have. It was a great investment.”

Chief Evans explained the tools can cut to 10,000 PSI and allow emergency responders to cut metal in newer, stronger vehicles.

“We had a demo of them, and we literally cut three cars apart before we had to change batteries,” Chief Evans said. “You can basically grab them and go anywhere – with them being battery-operated, if there’s a car down over the hill, you can grab them, grab a couple of batteries and go – you don’t have to worry about a portable power plant, tools and hoses.”

“These are going to start every time, no matter what – whether it’s five below zero or 105 degrees out.”

But, the fire department did purchase adaptors just in case. Each tool has its own power supply.

Township Supervisor Don Palmer, who has been involved in the fire service for 37 years – including in Blacklick and Indiana (coincidentally two rescue companies) – has also used the equipment.

“I’ve been on many, many, many vehicle accidents where we’ve had to use these tools,” Palmer said. “They do make a difference.”

With the added equipment, Manor Township volunteers can now be requested by another department for rescue.

Palmer explained the tools were purchased through Act 13 Marcellus Shale impact fees

“If we are able to help save one life, the investment was worth it,” Palmer concluded.

The tools will also be useful in some farm rescue applications and trench rescue.

The fire department has 17 State-certified vehicle rescue technicians and two State-certified vehicle rescue instructors – including Palmer and Larry Rice.

Gun Safety Seminar to Educate Community

Manor Township Police Corporal Eric Petrosky gives the monthly report to supervisors during last night’s public meeting. Corporal Petrosky will again lead a safety seminar this month, but this month instead of home security, it is regarding gun safety.

by Jonathan Weaver

Hunters anxiously waiting to get back into the woods will want to stop by a Manor Township safety lesson before the weather gets colder.

Manor Township Police Corporal Eric Petrosky and Township Supervisor Don Palmer have brainstormed another community seminar for Wednesday concerning gun safety.

Scheduled to start at 6:30PM at the Manor Township administration building, Corporal Petrosky said the training comes as many find the area “a good place to hunt.”

“Hunting season is coming up, so there (are) going to be more firearms available to people – adults and children. So what we want to do is take a proactive approach and just cover the basics of firearm safety – pointing the weapon in a safe direction, do not put your finger on the trigger until you’re ready to squeeze, how to handle the firearms, Corporal Petrosky said.

“If somebody’s out hunting and accidentally leaves a firearm in the woods or on the back of a pick-up and it falls off and someone else finds it, (we’re trying to) put into somebody’s mind how they can safely handle the firearm or leave it there and contact the police.”

While being the primary speaker, Corporal Petrosky said County Sheriff Bill Rupert was also invited to assist with the presentation.

“We’re always trying to work with other departments as other departments want to work with us,” Corporal Petrosky said.

All ages are invited to the estimated-90 minute seminar.

Next month, township supervisors will consider a motion that was tabled last night to hire more part-time police.

Supervisor Palmer last night recommended Supervisors hire at least four new officers – including at least one female.

Palmer said nothing specifically made him make that request, but that it was to ensure a smooth-flowing allotment of police patrol during the month.

Corporal Petrosky stood behind the recommendation to help with grant writing and organization diversity.

“A female officer would be great to search females that we bring in, but it also shows that we’re a diverse department. Any time you can diversify the department, it’s going to help it along the way,” Corporal Petrosky said.

However, Supervisor Chair Paul Rearick and Bob Southworth requested some more time and information to consider the hires. There is currently only one vacant police badge in the 11-man department.

“I agree 100 percent – I just want to have some more time to sit down and think about it, discuss with (Petrosky), Chief (Michael Karabin) and Sergeant (Terry Bish) about where you see this going,” Rearick said. “I’m probably going to go for it, but I want to make sure it’s justified.”

Supervisors did approve to retain Officers Mark Brice and Bryce Foreback after their six-month probationary period and give them the conditional monetary raise.

In other police matters, Corporal Petrosky and Officer Mark Brice attended the Labor Day Weekend “Operation Nighthawk” DUI enforcement.

Corporal Petrosky said the weekend was successful to ensure local residents’ safety. Those traffic arrests and citations will be evident on the September police report.

That was the third “Operation Nighthawk” training Corporal Petrosky attended – the past two being with the Pennsylvania State Police in Greensburg

“Every time I go, I learn something new,” Corporal Petrosky said. “There’s always something new to learn.”

State Police Lieutenant Chris Yanoff and Sergeant Douglas Smith also met with supervisors before the meeting

Palmer said he wants to continue the working relationship between departments.